Listen to Lama Yeshe’s Karma Workshop from March 19, 2017!

Listen to first session of the teaching

Listen to second session of the teaching 

The KARMA workshop illustrated how we continually create both positive and negative karma.  We do this with our actions of thought, word, and deed.  Our present circumstances are the result of past actions and our current activity leaves traces that will influence future situations.  Lama Yeshe offered many practices, including meditation, to positively impact our interactions with ourselves and the world around us.   The great thing about karma is that it can be purified.  We think of freedom as the ability to do and say anything.  Unfortunately most of these actions are based on habitual urges and impulses.  Freedom lies in every moment, when it arises.  It entails following our wisdom and inspiration instead of our current likes and dislikes.  Ultimate freedom comes when we are free of karma and can see things as they truly are, without our preconceptions.   At that point our actions will be totally spontaneous and our ability to benefit for ourselves and others will be limitless.

ABOUT LAMA TSULTRIM YESHE

Lama Tsultrim Yeshe is an American born ordained Tibetan Buddhist teacher. He serves as the Head Teacher and Director of the Hay River Buddhist Center in Ridgeland, Wisconsin. He travels throughout the US and abroad sharing Buddhist perspectives on emotional healing, forgiveness and trauma recovery. In 2013, he was invited to bring his healing message to Newtown, Connecticut in the aftermath of the tragic school shooting. Lama Yeshe served as a prison chaplain for eight years before becoming a full time Buddhist teacher.

Lama Yeshe is available for meditation instruction and personal consultation by appointment. This can be set up with him personally; the Lama can be reached at (715) 949-1407 by phone, or at 108yeshe@gmail.com.

Hay River KTC at sunrise. Photo by Lama Yeshe.

Impermanencia

I went to Ecuador to teach the Buddhadharma.

In Cuenca it looked like they were welcoming me with this sign. It is Spanish for impermanence; one of the basic teachings of the Buddha. All physical things change, including our bodies. All experience changes too. The good times don’t last, neither do the bad times. It is important because without change, there would be no room for new/fresh experience to arise.

The sign was for an art show not my talks.

— Lama Yeshe

 

Manure for the Field of Awakening

Where ever I go to teach I meet people who are suffering from the results of trauma. Not everyone tells me about their childhood experience, not even in private, but I estimate up to 50% of the people who attend my teachings have childhood trauma. When I was a prison chaplain for the state of Wisconsin I found the prison system is full of people who experienced childhood trauma. This is a workable situation. You can go from being a victim (or survivor) of trauma to a person who experienced trauma in the past. There are many methods in Buddhism that are extremely helpful in going to the root of the problem and transforming one’s life. In the Seven Points of Mind Training there is the saying “Manure for the field of awakening.” If you look at your past as shit it is a big problem. If you can see it as manure and learn proper manure handling techniques you find you are rich in resources for growth. Three of my favorite programs are THE HEALING POWER OF FORGIVENESS, EMOTIONAL HEALING FROM TRAUMA and USING LIFE’S MANURE FOR SPIRITUAL GROWTH. Please contact me if you would like me to teach in your area.

Let’s get to work.   — Lama Yeshe

Contact Lama Tsultrim Yeshe at 715-949-1407 or at yeshe@chibardun.net